Initial stages of group therapy

Each stage differs in the condition of clients, effective therapeutic strategies, and optimal leadership characteristics. For example, in early treatment, clients can be emotionally fragile, ambivalent about relinquishing chemicals, and resistant to treatment. Thus, treatment strategies focus on immediate concerns:

Initial stages of group therapy

As a facilitator, knowing what to look for and how to manage the challenges can have a big impact on how your group progresses.

Stage 1 -- Orientation Forming: Students watch the facilitator and each other for cues and clues, and seek guidelines and stated expectations. They want to feel safe and comfortable, and many will do only limited sharing until that comfort zone is established.

As a facilitator, you can call on these students to give examples, be the first to answer questions, and model positive interactions for the other group members.

Start studying Yalom's Stages in group therapy. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. A simple way to remember the stages of group therapy is as follows: form, storm, norm, perform, and adjourn. For its members, a therapy group begins with the group’s first gathering (form). Early meetings are frequently accompanied by some level of conflict (storm) as members learn to work together and establish the “rules” of the group. Five Stages of Group Development. Groups tend to develop in stages. As you work with a support group, or with almost any group of people who are working together toward a common cause, you'll be able to see the progression.

As the group leader, you can also help your students move through orientation successfully by providing clear guidelines, information, and structure, by listening with compassion and keeping communication open and respectful. You may want to begin your group with some low risk warm-up activities that help them get to know each other or get more comfortable in the group setting.

Stage 2 -- Power Struggle Storming: As students become more comfortable, they may challenge each other or the facilitators, attempt to form cliques and exclude or ignore certain students, and push limits.

As a facilitator, one of your main challenges is to maintain boundaries, be an active but compassionate leader, let everyone be heard and express thoughts and feelings, while teaching, reminding, and requiring them to stay respectful and productive.

You can acknowledge differences, and still model creative problem solving, helping students to focus on what they have in common, and building a more cohesive group. Stage 3 — Cooperation and Integration Norming: This is where being in group becomes fun and enjoyable most of the time.

Group interaction becomes easier, more cooperative, and productive, with balanced give and take, open communication, bonding, and mutual respect. Group leadership is still important, but the facilitator can step back a little and let group members initiate more and move forward together.

As a facilitator, you can stay aware and help the group get back on track as needed, encourage participation and creativity, and enjoy the flow of the activities. Continue to give support and encouragement, reinforce the positive feel of the group, and fine tune as needed.

Stage 4 — Synergy Performing: Not every group reaches this level, and if you spend most of a school year in Stage 3, it will still be a productive and enjoyable group. The power struggle stage lasted quite awhile with these students, because they all knew each other and had their own sets of histories and struggles.

But in the second and third years, we spent most of the time in this synergy mode, and it was one of the most productive, enjoyable, funny, connected group of students I ever worked with.

Initial stages of group therapy

Many of them stayed in touch even after they left our school — some are still connected now. Stage 5 — Closure Adjourning: After weeks or months of a smoothly running group, as the end of group or the school year approaches, things may start to fall apart for no apparent reason.

Students may bicker with and criticize each other, and anger may surface in unexpected ways. This is a normal part of group process. Being angry with each other, or in conflict, is easier for many students than feeling or addressing the sadness of saying goodbye.

Students who have abandonment issues may become especially argumentative or unruly.Group Therapy is traditionally broken down into 4 key stages: initial, transition, working and final.

These group therapy stages are essential parts of a chemical dependency recovery program. Find out how the 4 key stages of group therapy work together for effective results.

Initial stages of group therapy

A simple way to remember the stages of group therapy is as follows: form, storm, norm, perform, and adjourn. For its members, a therapy group begins with the group’s first gathering (form). Early meetings are frequently accompanied by some level of conflict (storm) as members learn to work together and establish the “rules” of the group.

Five Stages of Group Development. Groups tend to develop in stages. As you work with a support group, or with almost any group of people who are working together toward a common cause, you'll be able to see the progression. Transcript of Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages.

Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages Chapter 7: Transition Stage of a Group Chapter 8: Working Stage of a Group Chapter 9: Final Stage of a Group Chapter 6: Initial Stages of Groups Characteristics of Initial Stage Participants test the atmosphere and get acquainted.

Five Stages of Group Development. Groups tend to develop in stages. As you work with a support group, or with almost any group of people who are working together toward a common cause, you'll be able to see the progression.

As a facilitator, knowing what to look for and how to manage the challenges can have a big impact on how your group progresses. Group Therapy is traditionally broken down into 4 key stages: initial, transition, working and final.

These group therapy stages are essential parts of a chemical dependency recovery program. Find out how the 4 key stages of group therapy work together for effective results.

Groups: Initial-Transition-Working-Final Stages by Kristina Lopez on Prezi